Bringing South Voices into the Dialogue: ASAP Helps Develop Global Justice Center at Delhi University

March 2, 2013 in News

Delhi University

As an emerging global power, India has increasingly felt the domestic effects of its international immersion in networks of trade, investment and security. A new global justice program at the University of Delhi will explore the moral and ethical dimensions of such issues, with an emphasis on bringing more voices from India and the Global South into global justice debates.

The Nyaya program — Hindi for justice – is being developed by ASAP Board Member Ashok Acharya, a longtime faculty member at Delhi University, with support from ASAP Chair Thomas Pogge at Yale University and Board Member Luis Cabrera at the University of Birmingham. The three partnered to secure funding from the British Council which will support short-term doctoral student exchanges, a major conference in Spring 2014, ’Global Justice and the Global South,’ at Delhi University, and a doctoral student workshop at Birmingham, along with a continuing seminar series at Delhi.

“Setting up a global justice programme in India, and especially at the University of Delhi, has been a dream project that I have been nurturing for the past 10 years or so,” Acharya said. “I’m sure, once established, this will grow from strength to strength and bring together the best of the minds from across the world and apply them to resolve key global inequities.”

Pogge said he sees the project as “bringing together three strong and dynamic research communities into sustained collaboration. This is a highly cost-effective way of enhancing the global justice work each of these communities is already doing: improving its quality, extending its reach and strengthening its practical impact. We are very grateful to the British Council for this far-sighted and profoundly important initiative.”

Mobility exchange students from Delhi will be hosted by Yale’s Macmillan Center Global Justice Programme, and at Birmingham in the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics.

The Nyaya progamme’s development is funded through the British Council’s Trilateral Research in Partnership (TRIP) Awards, the first strand of the successful UK-India Education and Research Initiative (UKIERI) to partner with the United States.

For more information, contact Luis Cabrera at a.l.cabrera@bham.ac.uk