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Category: NEWS

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A Word from the ASAP President…

In 2022, Academics Stand Against Poverty inaugurated the Ambedkar Grants for Advancing Poverty Eradication (AGAPE), providing competitive funding and mentoring for innovative pilot projects in severe poverty eradication with strong prospects of cost-effective scale-up. The first four grants have been made, and a new round of AGAPE grant funding for 2023 was announced. 

In partnership with Global Financial Integrity, ASAP also selected and honored the winners of the Ninth Annual Amartya Sen Essay Prize Competition on illicit financial outflows from poor countries – while announcing the Tenth Competition and publishing the winning essays of the Eighth in Journal ASAP.

ASAP continues to work closely with Yale’s Global Justice Program on various fronts. One key idea is to incentivize the development and deployment of innovations through publicly funded impact rewards rather than patent-based monopoly rents. This option is needed especially in the domains of green and health technologies. Impact rewards would take account of the third-party effects of innovations, make beneficial innovations much more affordable, and draw R&D efforts to the specific needs of the poor. In partnership with JENA and AHETI in Africa, and RIS in India, we have been pushing this idea at the T7 and T20 as well as at COP27.

Another joint effort is focused on the 42% of humanity who cannot afford a healthy diet – a horrendous silent catastrophe that is widely ignored, with a large percentage of global food production wasted or converted to biofuels.

2022 saw the retirement of Helen Lang as ASAP’s Global Coordinator and Helen Yanacopulos as Secretary of the ASAP Board with our gratitude for their great contributions over many years. We welcome Zeke Ngcobo as our new Global Coordinator and plan to add one or two Board Members soon.

Academics Stand Against Poverty is still more wish than reality. But if even just one in a thousand scholars and educators were actively to join us, we would stand a real chance to achieve at least that small shift in the global distribution needed to end the more severe forms of poverty.

Thank You.

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Tenth Annual Amartya Sen Prize

This year, Global Financial Integrity, Academics Stand Against Poverty and Yale’s Global Justice Program will be awarding the Tenth annual Amartya Sen Prizes to the two best original essays examining one particular component of illicit financial flows, the resulting harms, and possible avenues of reform. Illicit financial flows are explicitly recognized as an obstacle to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and are singled out as target #4 of SDG 16.

They are defined as cross-border movements of funds that are illegally earned, transferred, or used – such as funds earned through illegal trafficking in persons, drugs, or weapons; funds illegally transferred through mispriced exchanges (e.g., among affiliates of a multinational firm seeking to shift profits to reduce taxes); goods misinvoiced or funds moved in order to evade taxes; and funds used for corruption of or by public or corporate officials.  

Components of illicit financial flows can be delimited by sector or geographically. Delimitation by sector might focus your essay on some specific activity, business, or industry – such as art, real estate, health care, technology, entertainment, shipping, weapons, agriculture, sports, gaming, education, politics, tourism, natural resource extraction, banking, and financial services – or on an even narrower subsector such as the diamond trade, hunting, insurance, or prostitution.  Delimitation by geography might further narrow the essay’s focus to some region, country, or province.

Your essay should describe the problematic activity and evaluate the adverse effects that make it problematic.  You should estimate, in quantitative terms if possible, the magnitude of the relevant outflows as well as the damage they do to affected institutions and populations.  This might include harm from abuse, exploitation, and impoverishment of individuals, harm through subdued economic activity and reduced prosperity, and/or harm through diminished tax revenues that depress public spending.

Your essay should also explain the persistence of the harmful activity in terms of relevant incentives and enabling conditions and, based on your explanation, propose plausible ways to curtail the problem.  Such reform efforts might be proposed at diverse levels, including supranational rules and regimes, national rules, corporate policies, professional ethics, individual initiatives, or any combination thereof.  The task is to identify who has the responsibility, the capacity, and (potentially) the knowledge and motivation to change behavior toward effective curtailment. Special consideration will be given to papers that provide a detailed description of how change may come about in a particular geographical or sectoral context.

We welcome authors from diverse academic disciplines and from outside the academy. Please send your entry by email attachment on or before 31 August 2023 to Tom Cardamone at SenPrize@gfintegrity.org.  While your message should identify you, your essay should be stripped of self-identifying references, and formatted for blind review.

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2022 All ASAP Annual Meeting

Technology & Justice

Our very own ASAP session hosted a number of ASAP members as speakers. We look forward to our next annual conference where we welcome and encourage all our members to share their projects and published papers.

An exciting yet insightful and informative conference, in collaboration with ASAP,

Yale University, the Global Justice Program, and Quinnipiac University took place over a span of three days. Many of the panel sessions centered around themes associated with technology, justice, and the use of artificial intelligence were discussed.

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Transforming Africa’s Food Systems Webinar​

Jesuit Justice Ecology Network Africa (JENA) in collaboration with Academics Stand Against Poverty (ASAP), and Global Justice Program, Yale University organized a webinar themed, “Transforming Africa’s Food System towards Poverty Eradication”, drawing insights from a rich pool of experts across the globe.

The webinar was held on December 7, 2022, from 3:00 to 5:00 pm East African Time. The webinar drew from the urgent need to reform the current food system to adhere to the present realities as the world works towards transitioning into sustainable food systems. The themes of the webinar and points of discussion captured the reality in most parts of the African continent and other parts of the globe coming to terms with social and economic challenges.

The goal of the webinar and theme was to collate and share insights believed to be integral in driving the food security agenda in the face of growing development challenges likely stemming from past successes and progress toward creating sustainable food systems that meet the needs of the region.

The full report can be obtained at https://globaljustice.yale.edu/news/food-systems-webinar 

Kevin Ouko, the writer of this post,  is a Research and Policy Analyst on Rethinking Africa’s Development at JENA

NEWS

29th April, 3pm – 4pm (BST time) Book Launch – Cities Without Capitalism

PLEASE CLICK TO BOOK YOUR FREE TICKETS

Dedicated to the Memory of the Great Thinker and Activist, Prof. Peter Marcuse

Book Launch: Cities Without Capitalism
Edited by: Hossein Sadri & Senem Zeybekoglu
Foreword by: Peter Marcuse

Book Description

This book explores the interconnections between urbanization and capitalism to examine the current condition of cities due to capitalism. It brings together interdisciplinary insights from leading academics, activists and researchers to envision progressive, anti-capitalist changes for the future of cities.

The exploitative nature of capitalist urbanization, as seen in the manifestation of modern cities, has threatened and affected life on Earth in unprecedented ways. This book unravels these threats to ecosystems and biodiversity and addresses the widening gap between the rich and the poor. It considers the future impacts of the capitalist urbanization on the planet and the generations to come and offers directions to imagine and build de-capitalised and de-urbanised cities to promote environmental sustainability. Written in lucid style, the chapters in the book illustrate the current situation of capitalist urbanization and expose how it exploits and consumes the planet. It also looks at alternative habitat practices of building autonomous and ecological human settlements, and how these can lead to a transformation of capitalist urbanization.

The book also includes current debates on COVID-19 pandemic to consider post-pandemic challenges in envisioning a de-capitalised, eco-friendly society in the immediate future. It will be useful for academics and professionals in the fields of sociology, urban planning and design and urban studies.

Table of Contents
Foreward Peter Marcuse

Part 1: Cities and Capitalism

1. Cities Without Capital: A Systemic Approach
Porus D. Olpadwala

2. Cities and Subjectivity Within and Against Capitalism
Kanishka Goonewardena and Sinead Petrasek

3. Can Urbanization Reduce Inequality and Limit Climate Change?
William W. Goldsmith

4. Tent City Urbanism
Andrew Heben

Part 2: Cities Against Capitalism

5. Transition Design as a Strategy for Addressing Urban Wicked Problems
Gideon Kossoff and Terry Irwin

6. Transition Pioneers: Cultural Currents and Social Movements of Our Time That “Preveal” the Future Post-Capitalist City
Juliana Birnbaum

7. Urban Commons: Toward a Better Understanding of the Potentials and Pitfalls of Self-Organized Projects
Mary H. Dellenbaugh-Losse

8. Counteracting the Negative Effects of Real Estate-Driven Urbanism + Empowering the Self-Constructed City
David Gouverneur

Part 3: Cities Without Capitalism9. What Will a Non-capitalist City Look Like?
Tom Angotti

10. Towards Democratic and Ecological Cities
Yavor Tarinski

11. The Coming Revolution of Peer Production and the Synthetisation of the Urban and Rural: The Solution of the Contradiction between City and the Country
Jakob Rigi

NEWS

Campaign – The Russian Invasion of Ukraine: Making Tourism a Force for Peace

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The Russian Invasion of Ukraine: Making Tourism a Force for Peace – A Call From Tourism and Hospitality Academicians and Students
On February 24, 2022, the Russian Federation invaded Ukraine and so began the largest assault on a European state since 1945.

Please sign the following campaign: https://www.change.org/p/tourismforceforpeace

Accordingly, tourism academicians:

• voice support for the call from Colombia, Guatemala, Lithuania, Poland, Slovenia, and Ukraine requesting the suspension of the membership of the Russian Federation from the UNWTO in accordance with Article 34 of the Statutes for conducting a policy, contrary to the fundamental aim of the Organization as enshrined in Article 3 of the Statutes of the UNWTO [12].

• call on the members of the World Travel and Tourism Council to suspend any business operations they have in the Russian Federation and to make the extent of their business operations in the country transparent to the travelling public.

• call on tourism-related academic departments and institutions to suspend all institutional relations with departments and institutions in the Russian Federation.

In order to fulfill the values of tourism as a force for peace, and to reinforce sanctions regimes we further encourage:

• all travel and tourism businesses to suspend their activities that enable tourist traffic to and from the Russian Federation.

• ask all tourists to not travel to the Russian Federation until such time as Russia has withdrawn from Ukraine and ceased its armed aggression in compliance with UN General Assembly Resolutions.

In conclusion, we invite representatives of the tourism and hospitality academy and students of tourism and related fields of study to sign this petition against the Russian invasion of Ukraine.  If you support this initiative, please support our action by signing and by sharing:  

Let us make a #TourismForceForPeace until justice has been served.

Authors:

Michal Apollo, University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland; Global Justice Program, Yale University, USA; Academics Stand Against Poverty, USA

C. Michael Hall, University of Canterbury, New Zealand; Oulu University, Finland; Linnaeus University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden; Taylor’s University, Malaysia; Co-editor, Current Issues in Tourism

Ian Wickens, On Tourism & Sustainability, UK